Kali

finite element destruction tool set

FINITE ELEMENT DESTRUCTION

Kali is MPC’s finite element destruction toolset, originally developed for Sucker Punch in 2011. Named after the Hindu god of destruction, it has quickly become one of our primary tools for film FX work. Based on the DMM engine from Pixelux, Kali continues to find new uses in our FX toolset.

Kali is MPC’s finite element destruction toolset, originally developed for Sucker Punch in 2011. Named after the Hindu god of destruction, it has quickly become one of our primary tools for film FX work. Based on the DMM engine from Pixelux, Kali continues to find new uses in our FX toolset.

DEFINE PHYSICAL PROPERTIES

Kali allows materials to flex and bend before breaking and the ability to define physical properties to each different material. This allows artists to realistically simulate wood, metal and stone breaking. It also gives MPC’s modelers the freedom to create assets without regard for how they would break, eliminating the time consuming process of pre-cutting geometry.

Kali allows materials to flex and bend before breaking and the ability to define physical properties to each different material. This allows artists to realistically simulate wood, metal and stone breaking. It also gives MPC’s modelers the freedom to create assets without regard for how they would break, eliminating the time consuming process of pre-cutting geometry.

TETRAHEDRAL FINITE ELEMENT

Kali uses a tetrahedral finite element representation of geometry. We have chosen to use a cage based approach, separating the rendered geometry from geometry used for simulation. This allows artists to define simulations as they wish, adding fracture detail and altering the shapes of collision objects independently of the rendered geometry. Simulation detail can be changed shot to shot, with more tetrahedra in areas where attention will be focused. A single tetrahedral mesh can map to many pieces of render geometry, or vice versa.

Kali uses a tetrahedral finite element representation of geometry. We have chosen to use a cage based approach, separating the rendered geometry from geometry used for simulation. This allows artists to define simulations as they wish, adding fracture detail and altering the shapes of collision objects independently of the rendered geometry. Simulation detail can be changed shot to shot, with more tetrahedra in areas where attention will be focused. A single tetrahedral mesh can map to many pieces of render geometry, or vice versa.

LESS CYCLIC INTER-DEPENDENCY

Render geometry is chopped at render-time against the last frame of simulation, so changes to the model simply require a re-chop, not a re-sim or re-cache. Likewise, changes to the simulation do not require remodelling. This leads to efficiency gains as there is far less cyclic inter-dependency between our modelling, lighting and simulation teams. This approach is general and will work with simulations and animations created with other tools, too.

Render geometry is chopped at render-time against the last frame of simulation, so changes to the model simply require a re-chop, not a re-sim or re-cache. Likewise, changes to the simulation do not require remodelling. This leads to efficiency gains as there is far less cyclic inter-dependency between our modelling, lighting and simulation teams. This approach is general and will work with simulations and animations created with other tools, too.

POWERFUL EVENT SYSTEM

Kali has an event system that allows TDs to add features to the system as needed. We’ve created a library of standard events, e.g. for pinning, driving, and controlling material toughness. Every tet-mesh has one or more materials assigned to it, controlling flexibility, brittleness, resilience, etc. A wide range of material types can be defined. Material properties can be changed during simulation using the event system.

Kali has an event system that allows TDs to add features to the system as needed. We’ve created a library of standard events, e.g. for pinning, driving, and controlling material toughness. Every tet-mesh has one or more materials assigned to it, controlling flexibility, brittleness, resilience, etc. A wide range of material types can be defined. Material properties can be changed during simulation using the event system.

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